Adventure Travel Blogging

Rare Photos of Baby Harpy Eagle

Rare Photos of Baby Harpy Eagle
Harpy Eagles are one of the most powerful birds of prey in the world. Their talons are the size of Grizzly Bear claws and their gigantic beaks make quick work of the monkeys and sloths they hunt for food.  These massive birds of prey have a wingspan of six to seven feet and, when sitting, have the height of a five-year-old child. They are also one of the least observed raptor species in the world. Combined with diminished number due to habitant loss and human trophy hunters, Harpy Eagles don't soar to hunt, but lurk in the trees like a gigantic winged monstrosity, waiting to ambush prey in surprise. (It goes without saying that monkey and sloth nightmares are dominated by Harpy Eagles.) They also require a huge territory for hunting, with a single pair occupying between 3,000 and 7,000 hectares of forest. So for birders and wildlife enthusiasts alike, a close...
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2020 Hits

A Father-Daughter Trip to Peru

A Father-Daughter Trip to Peru
Molly Greathouse and her father John traveled with Wildland Adventures to Peru over spring break on our Best of Peru itinerary. Both Molly and John are journalists and Molly was nice enough to share her stories from the trip, which she published on her personal blog.  To follow their journey and view Peru (and family travel) through the eyes of a college student, click on the links below. A great resource for parents who may be considering a similar trip with a college-aged child!Blog 1: Getting Ready for PeruBlog 2: Arrival to the Urubamba Valley Blog 3: Pre-Incan Structures, a Shaman & ChichaBlog 4: The Trek to Machu Picchu, or, How I Lost the Use of My Legs Blog 5: Machu Picchu & Wayna Picchu Blog 6: Cusco Churches, Tourism Police & FoodBlog 7: The Amazon: No Internet and a Whole Lot of Bugs  Thanks for sharing Molly! It was fun to read about your journey and...
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2436 Hits

Savings in South America

Savings in South America
Blossoming cherry trees, tulips and daffodils up north mean that the leaves of the beech trees in Torres del Paine and Los Glacieres National Park have all turned red and gold, sure signs that winter in the Southern hemisphere is not far off. But it isn’t too early to start planning your trip for next season to... For the first time in years, the cost of travel to Patagonia has decreased! Chile has eliminated the $160 Reciprocity Fee US citizens were formerly charged upon arrival into Santiago, a considerable savings for families. If you have some flexibility with your dates and aren’t set on traveling over the peak months of December, January and February, you can stretch your travel dollars further by booking one of the discounted shoulder season departures with savings of up to $1000 per person. (See below for a complete listing of discounted departure dates.) I had such...
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2462 Hits

Be Moved by the Mountains

Be Moved by the Mountains
Being surrounded by raw natural beauty stirs the soul in ways that we as humans can feel and recognize but perhaps not accurately describe. Recent Wildland traveler Steve Fors, who embarked on our Machu Picchu Mountain Lodges Trek in March, very eloquently summed up his experience trekking through the Cordillera Vilcabamba.  “Our trekking guides Manolo and Darwin were off-the-chart fabulous in every way. My favorite moments for the trip were as follows; we went out on the upstairs deck at Salkantay Lodge, shut off all nearby lights and saw the most spectacular stars I have ever seen. While the sky above us was clear, there were thunderstorms nearby. The valley below lit up several times. Then lightning lit up Mt. Salkantay and its neighbors several times. When we hiked over Salkantany Pass, the mountain was obscured by clouds and fog. The next morning we awakened to clear sky, the first rays of...
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2571 Hits

Why Shoulder Season Travel is Spectacular!

Why Shoulder Season Travel is Spectacular!
I recently returned from a trip to Peru with my brother to trek the Inca Trail and search for wildlife in the Amazon region of Tambopata. Our trip was in early March, just a few days after the Inca Trail opened for the 2014 season and right in the middle of Peru’s ‘rainy season.’  Traditionally, this is not thought of as an ideal time to go trekking since most people prefer not to hike in the rain. (Unless you live in the Pacific Northwest, then you are just used to it.)  Our timing wasn’t the best in that sense but we were just stoked to go so we packed the gortex, rain pants and ponchos and hoped for the best. It only rained on us twice in 16 days.  There were occasional wimpy sprinklings in the mornings but those didn’t even merit breaking out the rain jacket.  Mostly we had a...
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Recent comment in this post
Jonathan Burnham
Great blog Kirsten, thanks for the info on the shoulder season! I really need to head south for my next adventure!
Friday, 04 April 2014 11:54
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