Adventure Travel Blogging

In Pursuit of Pumas - An Osa Peninsula Adventure in Costa Rica

costa-rica-pumafb Costa Rica's elusive Puma
OSA PENINSULA WILDLAND ADVENTURE   Written by Costa Rica Program Director Grettel Calderon     As a native Costa Rican who has traveled all over every corner of my country, I can say with conviction that Corcovado National Park on the Osa Peninsula is the most remote, wild and spectacular region of Costa Rica, with the greatest amount of biodiversity in an already very diverse country. The diminutive Osa Peninsula is host to almost half of Costa Rica's 860+ species of birds (that is almost 5% of the world's species!), 140 species of mammals, and 117 species of reptiles and amphibians. Almost 750 species of trees have been catalogued in the area, more trees than in all of the North temperate regions of the world combined.   My recent inspection trip followed our Osa Peninsula Wildland Adventure itinerary and after I experienced it first hand, it quickly became one of my favorite...
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Breaking down the puzzle of Patagonia

Breaking down the puzzle of Patagonia
The Patagonia travel season is just around the corner! If you plan to travel South during our Northern Hemisphere winter season, now is the time to get your trip plans in order if you haven't already done so.   Traveling to Patagonia  or even beginning to research this fabled region of jagged peaks, windswept plains and massive glaciers can prove daunting.  Over the next few weeks, we'll be posting about the different regions within Patagonia, from Tierra del Fuego to the Valdes Peninsula to help you figure out what areas should be on the 'must visit' list for your next trip to southern Chile and Argentina. Up first, answers to two of the most frequent questions we receive; where is Patagonia and what is the best time to visit? Where is Patagonia? Patagonia is wild, windswept southern region of both Chile and Argentina that spans from the Pacific Ocean, over the Andes...
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Lonesome George dies in Galapagos

Lonesome George dies in Galapagos
  Lonesome George , the last surviving Pinta Island giant tortoise, has died in the Galapagos Islands. Scientists say he was over 100 years old. This review arrived from Cristina Valdivieso of Metropolitain Tours.   When the Galápagos Islands became a National Park in 1959, conservation priorities were a top priority for the world's scientific community. Giant tortoises, who gave their names to the remote archipelago, ranked high, together with the need to eradicate introduced animals (rats, goats, etc.) from the archipelago's days as a pirate bolt-hole. Hundreds of thousands of giant tortoises had been killed for food during the intense whaling years of the 18th and 19th centuries.  Conservation reached Galápagos too late for some. Floreana and Santa Fe Island Giant Tortoises had disappeared long ago, and the only known living tortoise from Fernandina Island was killed and preserved in the name of research and conservation during a United States...
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Dia del Padre in the Ecuadorian Highlands

Dia del Padre in the Ecuadorian Highlands
I spent Father's Day 2012 hiking, mountain biking and exploring life in the Andes of southern Ecuador where we encountered numerous festivals, visited native markets, and happened upon a local "Festival de Maiz" where 20 native villages proudly set up tents to display their corn harvests, shamans conducted healings, and local dancers performed their regional music and dance. It's amazing the ground you can cover in just a few days traveling through Ecuador, one of the world's most culturally and biologically diverse countries from the Galapagos Islands, to the Pacific coastal lowlands, Andean highlands, and the Amazon rainforest.   As President of the International Galapagos Tour Operators Association I came here to chair a board meeting of our professional organization dedicated to conervation and better tourism management in the archaepeligo. We heard from representatives of the World Wildlife Fund working in the islands for better nature-based tourism, the Director of the Galapagos...
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Walks and Wines of Geneva Region, Switzerland

Walks and Wines of Geneva Region, Switzerland
We started our journey of Switzerland walking and "wining" our way through the more urbane French-speaking region of Lake Geneva.  In a well planned and orchestrated itinerary, we moved easily through the countryside from Geneva, to Lausanne and Montreux  by train, boat, walking and bicycle. Sharing 95% of its borders with France, the seat of many international organizations, and a favorite respite and creative hangout for Freddy Mecury, Phil Collins, David Bowie, Audrey Hepburn, and many other celebrities and lesser known sophisticates, the Geneva region has it all. We walked the cobblestone streets of the old towns and hit several farmer's markets where we stocked up on cheese, olives, wine and fresh baked goods for our afternoon appetizers or lunches on the train. Historically, Geneva was a strategic transport and trade route used by the Romans, and later controled by the Savoys who built a series of baronies and castellanies throughout this part...
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